11 Mysterious Graves

Findery

Some graves are mysterious because the identity of those within is unknown. Others, because of the legends surrounding them. And some, because the location is not quite known.

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The Female Stranger – One night in 1816 a couple walked into Gadsby’s Tavern in Alexandria, Viriginia. It was obvious to everyone inside that the woman was very sick. She was put up in a room and the doctor was called. But she soon died. The man requested that their identities be kept a secret, erected a grave marker and disappeared–his bills unpaid. Everyone kept the secret…we still don’t know who is buried in this grave. Some think it is Theodosia Burr.

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Lived Once, Buried Twice – While being buried alive was certainly possible, and greatly feared, it didn’t happen all that often. But Margorie McCall was one such person, who lived to see another day. Thank goodness for the grave…

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Article: Cemeteries Take QR Codes to the Grave

I guess it was only a matter of time before this sort of thing started to happen in cemeteries. Sooner of later we’ll get a hologram or something above a grave as well. What do you think? It could be a useful thing in some respects.

For more on QR Codes and the Grave, visit the link below:
http://bostinno.com/channels/cemeteries-take-qr-codes-to-the-grave/

Latest Site News

Tracing our History is now very close to completing its move to the new domain http://tracingourhistory.com . In fact I will soon be removing most of the content from the old site and simply leaving a redirection URL on the main page. There are just a few more things to do before I can make the move complete.

I have now got the ‘history’ section of the site up and running – currently there are a few links not working quite right, but it is very close to being finished – with the exception of the local history part of the page (but that won’t be too long).

http://tracingourhistory.com/history.html

I have issued 8 usernames and passwords to the private/secure section of the site, allowing these family members access to the family history book and eventually the tree and various other files that will be stored there. So things are moving along nicely I think.

Once the site is fully operational my attention will turn to work on headstones/cemeteries and trying to get a better system up on the site for those. I am also continuing to work away at the family history database and getting all of that information sorted out properly.

NABIAC/FAILFORD CEMETERY VISIT

I have been to the Nabiac/Failford Cemetery now, but failed to photograph all of the headstones in the cemetery. I will need to return in the next couple of days to complete the project. I will probably also visit the Bulahdelah Cemetery and photograph the headstones there.

I probably still have about one fifth to one quarter of the cemetery to photograph. I have come across a number of headstones that I recognize from my family history research, which is the main reason for taking the photographs.

OFF TO NABIAC CEMETERY

Sometime this week I’ll be heading to the cemetery near Nabiac, just south of Taree on the Pacific Highway. I believe the cemetery is located at Failford to the north of Nabiac.

What is the point of this particular trip to Nabiac? It will be same goal as that for the weekend (just passed) trip to the Coolongolook Cemetery – that is, to photograph the headstones in the cemetery for my family history research.

Following the trip to Nabiac I’ll probably pop up to Tinonee and visit my brother and his family.

VISIT TO COOLONGOLOOK CEMETERY

Yesterday I visited the Coolongolook Cemetery, which is to the north of Bulahdelah and south of Nabiac and Taree on the Pacific Highway, in New South Wales, Australia. I did this to photograph the headstones in the cemetery for future reference as I continue to research my family history.

 

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 ABOVE: Coolongolook Cemetery Sign

 

I would have taken about 200 photographs during my visit and these will be added to my database of cemeteries and headstones that I am developing as part of my family history research. Eventually I hope to be able to cross reference the headstones with what is known of family in my family history research. It would be great to be able to have a photograph of the headstone marking the final resting place of those in my family tree. That is the goal anyhow, as well as being able to glean any additional information that I can to assist me in compiling my family history.

Eventually I also hope to have the photographs of Coolongolook Cemetery and the headstones contained therein on my family – online history site.