News: State Records NSW Open Day 2013

The link below is to an article reporting on the upcoming open day for State Records NSW – it is to be held on the 30th August 2013.

For more visit:
http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/news/open-day-2013

Photos: Grandparents Trip to Sydney

I have been working on various family archives recently and today photo archiving has been at the heart of what I have been doing. Sadly, most of the photos belonging to my mother’s parents have very little in the way of information attached to them in any manner whatsoever. There are no dates mentioned, very little in the way of location information, etc. The best descriptions I have for some of the photos are marked on the various envelopes that photos have been stored in – ‘west,’ ‘south’ and so on.

The photos in this post are clearly of Sydney and the envelope they were stored in marks them as ‘Opera House Trip.’ These photos are easily identified, being of major landmarks in my state’s capital city – Sydney. However, the photos have no indication of dates, which is disappointing. If I would have to guess I’d suggest the 1960s or 1970s. If you think you are able to hazard a useful guess at the date these photos were taken, please leave your thoughts in the comments.

One of the photos shows people walking through an area at the Opera House. In the photo there are four people in the front half of the photo – my grandmother is the woman on the right of this grouping of people, carrying a handbag.

Sydney Opera House  

 

ABOVE: Photos of the Sydney Opera House

ABOVE: Sydney Harbour Bridge

NEGLECTING OUR PAST

I have been reminded once again of how much Australians neglect our past. I have thought this for a long time and my visit to the Nabiac/Failford Cemetery reconfirmed my thoughts on the matter.

In the case of cemeteries the state of a cemetery quickly betrays this state of mind. Generally the lawns are very poorly maintained and most of the older (and a good number of the younger) graves are very poorly maintained. If there are gardens and/or lawn plantings – these also will be neglected.

When it comes to trying to read a headstone, generally speaking, the older the headstone the more difficult it is to read. Most of the older headstones are in varying degrees of decay (so to speak).

This neglect is not limited to cemeteries. In my travels around the country I have seen many examples of our heritage being allowed to fall into further ruin through neglect.

I really do think that the majority of Australians do not appreciate our heritage and history. Perhaps we are still too young as a country.