Elysium Space Finds A Taker For Its Moon Memorials

Elysium Space Finds A Taker For Its Moon Memorials

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

Only twelve people have stepped on the surface of the Moon, but soon, thanks to the space burial service Elysium Space, the first person will make the moon their final resting place.

The San Francisco-based company’s first lunar burial will be the mother of Steve Jenks of Tennessee who lost her life to cancer. Jenks, an infantryman in the Iraq war received regular correspondence from his mother, who finished every letter by assuring him, “No matter how lonely you feel and how far you are, always look at the Moon and know I am with you. I love you to the Moon and back.”

Steve Jenks with his mother of Seymour, Tennessee. Steve Jenks with his mother of Seymour, Tennessee.

Elysium has designed small metallic cubes to hold portions of the cremated remains of loved ones and is selling a service to launch clusters of these capsules into orbit or soft land them upon the lunar surface.

Elysium’s…

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Options for Digitizing Photos and Film

The link below is to an article that takes a look at options for digitizing your photo and film records.

For more visit:
http://www.geneabloggers.com/digitization-options-family-photos-including-slides-film-negatives-home-movies/

This digital graveyard will tell you how many times your name has “died”

This digital graveyard will tell you how many times your name has “died”

Originally posted on Quartz:

Here’s something that can make you feel very small. Or very large.

The New Republic has published an essay by Paul Ford exploring “the Social Security administration’s list of America’s dead.” With the information harvested, they’ve compiled this searchable database of recorded deaths in the United States, which stretches back to 1935 and contains over 94 million entries. Input your name to check just how many other “John Smiths” or “Jane Does” have expired before you, if any.

I have two names. Sort of. Officially speaking, my full name is John Mead Flanagin, Jr.—named for my father, who in turn was named for his great-uncle. I go by “Jake,” because having two Johns in a single household would have been confusing; and I suppose my parents thought “Jack” was cliché. (Ironically, Jake turned out to be one of the most popular boy’s names for 1990—the year of my birth.)

If I search TNR’s…

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